Health and Safety

We offer a complete range of health and safety consultancy services – site safety, workplace assessments, health, safety and welfare inspections with the provision of written reports, training and CPD, CDM and Construction Phase Plans, assistance with compliance, fire safety and much more.

Accident and Incident Investigation
Construction Phase plans
COSHH Assessments
Risk Assessments
Method Statements
Site Safety Inspections
PQQ Advice
Management Systems
Applications for Industry Accreditation
Toolbox Talks
DSE/ Workstation Assessments

Accident and Incident Investigation

It is essential to investigate accidents, incidents and near-misses soon after they occur, and it is even more important to learn from them and ensure they don’t happen again. That’s why we offer a health and safety incident and accident investigation support service.

Too many organisations fail to ensure that any health & safety breach or incident is reported and logged, and more dangerous still, they fail to learn from near misses – these little accidents that don’t cause any real harm are both warning signs and opportunities to learn valuable lessons, and for making changes before someone does get hurt.

How will we investigate?

At DCP Safety and Training, we have experience of carrying out incident and accident investigation support on a whole range of incidents – both big and small. Our investigation process may include:

  • Conducting interviews with relevant staff and workers
  • Inspections of the area where the accident took place
  • Forming an opinion of the sequence of events
  • Forming an opinion of contributory factors leading to the accident
  • Recommendations on how to avoid similar accidents in future

This allows us to present you with the following:

  • Identification of the factors that led to the incident
  • Determination of what changes need to be implemented to stop the issue arising again

Why do you need us?

Incident and accident investigations are a necessary part of health and safety management that you are legally required to carry out. However more than just complying with the law, our services can tell you a lot about what is really happening in your business:

  • Investigating your accidents and reported cases of occupational ill health would help you uncover and correct any breaches in legal compliance you may have been unaware of
  • It gives you the opportunity to learn and to change things before a serious incident occurs
  • The fact that you thoroughly investigated an incident and took remedial action to prevent further occurrences will help demonstrate to a court that your company has a positive attitude to health and safety, should the need arise
  • Your investigation findings will also provide essential information for your insurers in the event of a claim

An investigation can help you identify why the existing risk control measures failed and what improvements or additional measures are needed. It can:

  • Provide a real snapshot of how work is done (because no matter what rules you think you may have in place, workers often find shortcuts to make things easier or quicker)
  • Improve the management of risk in the future
  • Help other parts of your organisation learn
  • Demonstrate your commitment to effective health and safety
  • Improve employee morale and attitude towards health and safety

When should you call us?

It’s never too late for us to provide you with the incident and accident investigation support that you need, although the earlier we are involved, the bigger effect we can have. Ideally, contact us soon after the event and we can help you prepare for any enforcement visits, insurers reports, and other consequences, to help put your organisation in the best light.

Construction Phase plans

CDM 2015 specifies that a Construction Phase Plan is required on EVERY project, irrespective of size or duration.

CDM 2015 embeds health and safety considerations at the core of all construction projects.  The Regulations ensure that health & safety is considered throughout the design and construction process and that arrangements for appropriate health & safety measures are integral to the successful delivery of a project.  Key to this process is the requirement for a Construction Phase Plan

Previously a Construction Phase Plan (CPP) was only required on HSE Notifiable Projects (usually those lasting over 30 days), but that all changed with the introduction of CDM 2015 and now a CPP is required on every single project, commercial or domestic and regardless of whether it will take six months, a week or an afternoon to complete.

If you are a client, commissioning any kind of building work, large or small, you have a responsibility under CDM 2015 to ensure a Construction Phase Plan is in place.

What is a CPP?
Simply it is a document that must log the health & safety arrangements for the construction phase of a project, recording how significant health & safety risks will be managed including specific measures for the categories listed in Schedule 3 of the Regulations.

Information to include?

The emphasis is on including information that is relevant to the project, has sufficient detail to clearly set out & communicate the health and safety arrangements, the site rules and any special measures required to manage the construction but is still proportionate to the scale and complexity of the project and risks involved.

Who is responsible for the CPP?
The responsibility for producing the CPP rests with the Principal Contractor or Sole Contractor, but it is the duty of the Client to ensure that a Construction Phase Plan is in place.  On a large project your appointment of a Principal Designer might include checking an appropriate CPP is in place, and on a domestic project this responsibility will have automatically discharged to the builder but for small projects and maintenance activities where you don’t have a design team in place this responsibility will rest with the client.

Alarm bells ringing yet?
Don’t panic.  If you are  undertaking building work ask your Contractor whether they have prepared  a Construction Phase Plan?  If the answer is no – we can help.  With our comprehensive health & safety and design experience we are ideally placed to produce the appropriate Construction Phase Plan for your project and also provide expert assistance and advice on any other CDM 2015 related matter.

For help with producing a CPP or with any other CDM related query?

For further information and advice on all our CDM 2015 services contact:

Jon Rensink   – 01206 751284

COSHH Assessments

COSHH stands for the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health and often refers to the 2002 Health Regulations that require employers to prevent or reduce workers’ exposure to hazardous substances. These regulations require that the health risks arising from exposure to substances hazardous to health are avoided where this is reasonably practicable or that they are controlled where it is not reasonably practicable to avoid them.

You may think that because your business doesn’t deal with chemicals or toxic waste this doesn’t affect you, but hazardous substances can include;

  • Substances used directly in work activities (e.g adhesives, paints, cleaning agents)
  • Substances generated during work activities (e.g fumes from soldering and welding)
  • Naturally occurring substances (e.g grain dust)
  • Biological agents such as bacteria and other micro-organisms.

These substances can cause issues such as skin irritation, asthma, infections or, in the case of long term exposure, loss of consciousness or even cancer. A COSHH assessment will help you identify the substances that may be dangerous to your workers, establish whether the precautions you have taken are acceptable and what control measures need to be in place, thereby managing all associated risks.

Contact us today to see how we can assist with your COSHH Assessments.

Risk Assessments

What exactly is a risk assessment and why do you need one?

A risk assessment is the process of identifying what hazards currently exist (or may appear in future) and are likely to cause harm to employees and visitors in your workplace.

By law, every employer must conduct risk assessments on the work their employees do and if they employ more than five employees, then the results must be recorded with details of any groups of employees particularly at risk such as young, pregnant or disabled employees.

A good risk assessment involves looking for and listing the risks to health and safety including:

  • deciding who might be harmed and how;
  • checking that protective measures are effective;
  • evaluating the risks arising from the hazards and deciding whether existing precautions are adequate;
  • recording the findings;
  • reviewing the assessment from time to time and revising it when required, particularly if the building is refurbished, moved, or when there is a change in staffing.

What should a risk assessment include?

Risks need to be considered in all aspects of the working environment. Here are some examples of the things that should be included in a risk assessment:

  • Hazards: electrical safety, fire safety, manual handling, hazardous substances, risk factors for repetitive strain injury, stress, violence;
  • Tasks: cleaning with chemical substances, maintenance work or dealing with the public;
  • Organisational factors: staffing policies, systems of work, equipment-purchasing policies, consultation and participation, management techniques or working hours, shift patterns, lone working;

How can we help?

If you don’t feel confident about doing your own risk assessments, contact us now to find out how we can help. It may be that we can work with you to complete the assessment, or train you to be able to do them in future. Or you can hand the job over to us in its entirety and we will undertake your risk assessments for you, so you know you and your business are covered.

Method Statements

What’s a Method Statement?
Method statements are widely used as a way of controlling specific health and safety risks that have been identified (usually following completion of a riskassessment). It helps to manage the work and ensures that the necessary precautions have been identified, implemented and communicated to workers: So essentially, it’sa step by step guide on how to do the job safely.

When do you need one?

While Method statements are not a requirement of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations, they are identified by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) as one way of satisfying the requirements of the regulations and as an effective means of assessing risks, managing risks, collecting workers’ views and briefing workers.

They are often requested as part of a tender process and are an excellent way for your business to demonstrate how it can provide goods and services in a safe and quality manner. In this sense Method Statements become another piece of marketing material for your business to shout about what they do well.

A well-written Method Statement provides confidence to the reader that:

Why do you need us?

It can be difficult to know where to begin when faced with the task of writing a Method Statement so if it all seems a bit too daunting then contact us: We will work with you to develop an understanding of any job or task and any relevant risks and constraints. We can then produce a concise, clear Method Statement that ticks all the Health & Safety boxes and shows your business in the best possible light.

 

Site Safety Inspections

The Construction Industry is widely recognised as one of the most dangerous for workers; consequently it’s where the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) focus much of their attention.

An HSE Inspector could arrive unannounced on site at any time, to check compliance with health & safety legislation and Construction (Design and Management) Regulations.  It is your responsibility to be prepared for these inspections and to ensure your site & workforce complies – failing to do so can be an expensive & reputation damaging experience.

We’ve put together some FAQs (and the answers) to put you in the picture.

How can I make sure my site is HSE compliant?

Regular Site Safety Inspections and periodic audits carried out either by an appropriately trained member of staff or an independent third party will help ensure that your site complies with health and safety legislation and Construction (Design and Management) Regulations requirements.

Are site inspections really necessary?

Regular site inspections help you to reduce risk and maintain high levels of health & safety compliance on your work sites as required by the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.   Monitoring and reporting of health and safety compliance is a vital & necessary part of an organisation’s health and safety management system.

Site monitoring arrangements should be proactive, not reactive, and regular site inspections enable the identification of any shortcomings, improvements or changes required on a work site or to working practices before there is an accident or incident.

What are the benefits?

Site inspections and audits provide reassurance and peace of mind, to the workforce, your client and you. They are an opportunity to demonstrate that safe systems of work and good health and safety practices are being followed on site. They assist a company in building their standing as a safe & reputable firm.

How can we help?

Whilst site safety inspections can be carried out ‘in house’, outsourcing this important health and safety function is also a cost effective solution Daniel Connal Partnership has been carrying out site inspections on a wide variety of construction projects, nationwide, for more than 20 years. Our experienced health & safety professionals can save you staff time, training and money, providing independent unbiased site safety inspection reports, quickly and efficiently – it’s what we do!

The benefits of a DCP Site Safety Inspection/Audit include:

  • independent, unbiased, expert inspections carried out weekly, monthly or to a timescale to suit your specific requirements
  • proactive advice & assistance to ensure compliance with health & safety legislation and relevant standards
  • comprehensive written reports

What will I receive?

You will receive a written audit report, with recommendations, addressing the areas on your site which require close monitoring to help you improve your overall site health and safety performance. The reports will enable you to measure progress in managing health and safety risks on site to help ensure that when the HSE Inspector calls, your site is fully compliant with health & safety legislation and the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations.

Please contact us if you are interested in the site inspections and audit service or would like to know more about the services we offer.

 

PQQ Advice

What is a PQQ?

These days if you want to tender for jobs you often need to pass a PQQ (pre-qualification questionnaire) first. If you don’t pass that stage you won’t even be invited to tender – so getting your PQQ stock answers down pat can make all the difference to getting jobs.

What can we do to help?

PQQs almost always ask the same types of questions, and often it’s a case of having all your policies, procedures, method statements and risk assessments in order. Doing this may mean you discover an accreditation you don’t have that would exempt you from future PQQ questions, or a training need that’s not being met. We can help in all stages of the process – from reviewing current documentation, to writing entirely new policies, from helping you gain essential accreditations to providing the training courses your staff need to get up to speed. Get in touch with us today.

 

Management Systems

Health and Safety Management Systems are integral to your business as they recognise the link between the identification and control of risk, the health and wellbeing of your staff, and the success of the business itself.

What Should It Contain?

A good Health & Safety Management System should include:

  • Your Health and Safety Policy
  • Arrangements and organisation for managing safety in the workplace
  • Evidence of Health and Safety Audits, Inspections and Action Plans
  • All of your Risk Assessments and Reviews
  • Your plan for implementing controls
  • Evidence of Staff Training

How Can We Help?

If you don’t have an in-house Health & Safety expert then it can be difficult to know who within your organisation should be responsible for the job of putting together a competent and comprehensive Management System. It’s not something you should leave to anyone who isn’t suitably qualified and up to date. The sensible thing to do is outsource to us: We can create a bespoke system which complies with all regulations, ensures you’re covered for all eventualities and actually contributes to the success of your business. Get in touch to find out how we can take this load off your shoulders.

Company Policies and Procedures

Why Do I Need a Health & Safety Policy?

A good Health & Safety Policy is the cornerstone of many other policies, procedures, statements and accreditations that are essential to the success of your business. And did you know, it’s not just a nice to have – for the vast majority of businesses it’s a legal requirement?

What’s in a Good Health & Safety Policy?

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act (HSWA) 1974 says a Health & Safety Policy must contain three separate parts:

  • Health & Safety Policy Statement of Intent (aims and objectives);
  • Organisation of health and safety (who has responsibility for what); and
  • Arrangements for health and safety (how risks are managed)

The type of information included in your policy will depend on your business but common items include:

  • Employee Health & Safety Codes of Practice
  • Accident and illness reporting and investigation procedures
  • Emergency/fire drill procedures
  • Risk assessment procedures
  • First aid procedures
  • Control of exposure to specific hazards: noise, vibration, manual handling, hazardous substances, etc.
  • Machinery safety
  • Maintenance/PAT testing of electrical equipment
  • Maintenance procedures
  • PPE use
  • Monitoring procedures, including health and safety inspections
  • Procedures for dealing with contractors and visitors
  • Welfare facility provision
  • Training procedures
  • Catering and food hygiene procedures
  • Arrangements for consulting with employees
  • Policy for driving organisation vehicles
  • Smoking, drugs and alcohol policy.

How Can We Help?

As you can see from the above, there is a LOT to think about so don’t be tempted to use a generic template – at DCP Safety & Training we can write or review your Health and Safety Policy to match the specific needs of your business, putting in regular milestone reviews, and advising on ways that you can effectively and meaningfully communicate the policy to all your staff.

 

Applications for Industry Accreditation

(SMAS, CHAS, Safe Contractor, Constructionline etc)

Safety Schemes in Procurement (SSIP) is the mutual recognition scheme for occupational health and safety standards within construction. Gaining just one accreditation with a recognized Contractor Accreditation Scheme means you can satisfy your legal responsibilities in assessing competence and you don’t have to waste time and money putting in applications for numerous different accreditations. In practice, however, even gaining that one accreditation can take a considerable amount of effort!

DCP Safety and Training has years of experience in SSIP applications for SMAS, CHAS, Constructionline and Safe Contractor, and can work with you to develop your systems, policies and procedures to ensure they meet legal requirements and therefore the criteria of the individual schemes.  It may be that your systems and procedures are already to acceptable standards and you just require assistance in completing the necessary application forms. Either way we can help.

 

Toolbox Talks

A toolbox talk is an informal safety meeting that should be part of your business’ overall safety program. They are usually brief meetings conducted on site prior to the commencement of a job or work shift and may cover topics such as workplace hazards or site-specific safe work practices.

Toolbox talks are generally considered a very effective method for refreshing workers' knowledge in between training sessions, covering last-minute safety checks, and ensuring a meaningful exchange of information and skills between workers.

At DCP Safety & Training we can prepare a suite of bespoke toolbox talks for your company - from the basic principles and understanding of Health & Safety elements, to the particular risks your employees may face. Contact us to find out more.

 

DSE/ Workstation Assessments

DSE stands for display screen equipment and covers any work equipment that has a screen that displays information such as a computer screen or tablet. The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations place a duty on employers to ensure that their employees are provided with appropriate equipment, information and training to ensure their health and welfare is not adversely affected by DSE use.

This is because, as we all know probably only too well, the use of computer workstations or other DSE can often lead to the aches and pains referred to as upper limb disorders (ULDs) or repetitive strain injuries (RSI), as well as pain or discomfort to the neck, shoulder, back or arm, general fatigue and eyestrain.

It’s terribly important then that your employees understand and adopts good practice when using DSE - like having their screens at the correct height and takes regular breaks during intensive work. In most cases these precautions alone can reduce or eliminate many of those niggling symptoms and discomfort, but its easier said than done to fall back into bad habits or ignore an ache or pain.

DCP Safety and Training can help – by conducting a DSE Risk Assessment at your workplace we can ensure that everyone is fully trained in how to set up their workstation, adjust equipment accordingly, and are aware of the good practices to adopt. Individual written reports give line managers the information they need to understand and act on any issues preventing future problems arising and ensuring the health and productivity of your office-based workers.

Site Safety Inspections

The Construction Industry is widely recognised as one of the most dangerous for workers; consequently it’s where the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) focus much of their attention.

An HSE Inspector could arrive unannounced on site at any time, to check compliance with health & safety legislation and Construction (Design and Management) Regulations.  It is your responsibility to be prepared for these inspections and to ensure your site & workforce complies – failing to do so can be an expensive & reputation damaging experience.

We’ve put together some FAQs (and the answers) to put you in the picture.

How can I make sure my site is HSE compliant?

Regular Site Safety Inspections and periodic audits carried out either by an appropriately trained member of staff or an independent third party will help ensure that your site complies with health and safety legislation and Construction (Design and Management) Regulations requirements.

Are site inspections really necessary?

Regular site inspections help you to reduce risk and maintain high levels of health & safety compliance on your work sites as required by the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.   Monitoring and reporting of health and safety compliance is a vital & necessary part of an organisation’s health and safety management system.

Site monitoring arrangements should be proactive, not reactive, and regular site inspections enable the identification of any shortcomings, improvements or changes required on a work site or to working practices before there is an accident or incident.

What are the benefits?

Site inspections and audits provide reassurance and peace of mind, to the workforce, your client and you. They are an opportunity to demonstrate that safe systems of work and good health and safety practices are being followed on site. They assist a company in building their standing as a safe & reputable firm.

How can we help?

Whilst site safety inspections can be carried out ‘in house’, outsourcing this important health and safety function is also a cost effective solution Daniel Connal Partnership has been carrying out site inspections on a wide variety of construction projects, nationwide, for more than 20 years. Our experienced health & safety professionals can save you staff time, training and money, providing independent unbiased site safety inspection reports, quickly and efficiently – it’s what we do!

The benefits of a DCP Site Safety Inspection/Audit include:

  • independent, unbiased, expert inspections carried out weekly, monthly or to a timescale to suit your specific requirements
  • proactive advice & assistance to ensure compliance with health & safety legislation and relevant standards
  • comprehensive written reports

What will I receive?

You will receive a written audit report, with recommendations, addressing the areas on your site which require close monitoring to help you improve your overall site health and safety performance. The reports will enable you to measure progress in managing health and safety risks on site to help ensure that when the HSE Inspector calls, your site is fully compliant with health & safety legislation and the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations.

Please contact us if you are interested in the site inspections and audit service or would like to know more about the services we offer.

PQQ Advice

What is a PQQ?

These days if you want to tender for jobs you often need to pass a PQQ (pre-qualification questionnaire) first. If you don’t pass that stage you won’t even be invited to tender – so getting your PQQ stock answers down pat can make all the difference to getting jobs.

What can we do to help?

PQQs almost always ask the same types of questions, and often it’s a case of having all your policies, procedures, method statements and risk assessments in order. Doing this may mean you discover an accreditation you don’t have that would exempt you from future PQQ questions, or a training need that’s not being met. We can help in all stages of the process – from reviewing current documentation, to writing entirely new policies, from helping you gain essential accreditations to providing the training courses your staff need to get up to speed. Get in touch with us today.

Management Systems

Health and Safety Management Systems are integral to your business as they recognise the link between the identification and control of risk, the health and wellbeing of your staff, and the success of the business itself.

What Should It Contain?

A good Health & Safety Management System should include:

  • Your Health and Safety Policy
  • Arrangements and organisation for managing safety in the workplace
  • Evidence of Health and Safety Audits, Inspections and Action Plans
  • All of your Risk Assessments and Reviews
  • Your plan for implementing controls
  • Evidence of Staff Training

How Can We Help?

If you don’t have an in-house Health & Safety expert then it can be difficult to know who within your organisation should be responsible for the job of putting together a competent and comprehensive Management System. It’s not something you should leave to anyone who isn’t suitably qualified and up to date. The sensible thing to do is outsource to us: We can create a bespoke system which complies with all regulations, ensures you’re covered for all eventualities and actually contributes to the success of your business. Get in touch to find out how we can take this load off your shoulders.

Company Policies and Procedures

Why Do I Need a Health & Safety Policy?

A good Health & Safety Policy is the cornerstone of many other policies, procedures, statements and accreditations that are essential to the success of your business. And did you know, it’s not just a nice to have – for the vast majority of businesses it’s a legal requirement?

What’s in a Good Health & Safety Policy?

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act (HSWA) 1974 says a Health & Safety Policy must contain three separate parts:

  • Health & Safety Policy Statement of Intent (aims and objectives);
  • Organisation of health and safety (who has responsibility for what); and
  • Arrangements for health and safety (how risks are managed)

The type of information included in your policy will depend on your business but common items include:

  • Employee Health & Safety Codes of Practice
  • Accident and illness reporting and investigation procedures
  • Emergency/fire drill procedures
  • Risk assessment procedures
  • First aid procedures
  • Control of exposure to specific hazards: noise, vibration, manual handling, hazardous substances, etc.
  • Machinery safety
  • Maintenance/PAT testing of electrical equipment
  • Maintenance procedures
  • PPE use
  • Monitoring procedures, including health and safety inspections
  • Procedures for dealing with contractors and visitors
  • Welfare facility provision
  • Training procedures
  • Catering and food hygiene procedures
  • Arrangements for consulting with employees
  • Policy for driving organisation vehicles
  • Smoking, drugs and alcohol policy.

How Can We Help?

As you can see from the above, there is a LOT to think about so don’t be tempted to use a generic template – at DCP Safety & Training we can write or review your Health and Safety Policy to match the specific needs of your business, putting in regular milestone reviews, and advising on ways that you can effectively and meaningfully communicate the policy to all your staff.

Applications for Industry Accreditation /h4>
(SMAS, CHAS, Safe Contractor, Constructionline etc)

Safety Schemes in Procurement (SSIP) is the mutual recognition scheme for occupational health and safety standards within construction. Gaining just one accreditation with a recognized Contractor Accreditation Scheme means you can satisfy your legal responsibilities in assessing competence and you don’t have to waste time and money putting in applications for numerous different accreditations. In practice, however, even gaining that one accreditation can take a considerable amount of effort!

DCP Safety and Training has years of experience in SSIP applications for SMAS, CHAS, Constructionline and Safe Contractor, and can work with you to develop your systems, policies and procedures to ensure they meet legal requirements and therefore the criteria of the individual schemes.  It may be that your systems and procedures are already to acceptable standards and you just require assistance in completing the necessary application forms. Either way we can help.

 

Toolbox Talks

A toolbox talk is an informal safety meeting that should be part of your business’ overall safety program. They are usually brief meetings conducted on site prior to the commencement of a job or work shift and may cover topics such as workplace hazards or site-specific safe work practices.

Toolbox talks are generally considered a very effective method for refreshing workers' knowledge in between training sessions, covering last-minute safety checks, and ensuring a meaningful exchange of information and skills between workers.

At DCP Safety & Training we can prepare a suite of bespoke toolbox talks for your company - from the basic principles and understanding of Health & Safety elements, to the particular risks your employees may face. Contact us to find out more.

 

DSE/ Workstation Assessments

DSE stands for display screen equipment and covers any work equipment that has a screen that displays information such as a computer screen or tablet. The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations place a duty on employers to ensure that their employees are provided with appropriate equipment, information and training to ensure their health and welfare is not adversely affected by DSE use.

This is because, as we all know probably only too well, the use of computer workstations or other DSE can often lead to the aches and pains referred to as upper limb disorders (ULDs) or repetitive strain injuries (RSI), as well as pain or discomfort to the neck, shoulder, back or arm, general fatigue and eyestrain.

It’s terribly important then that your employees understand and adopts good practice when using DSE - like having their screens at the correct height and takes regular breaks during intensive work. In most cases these precautions alone can reduce or eliminate many of those niggling symptoms and discomfort, but its easier said than done to fall back into bad habits or ignore an ache or pain.

DCP Safety and Training can help – by conducting a DSE Risk Assessment at your workplace we can ensure that everyone is fully trained in how to set up their workstation, adjust equipment accordingly, and are aware of the good practices to adopt. Individual written reports give line managers the information they need to understand and act on any issues preventing future problems arising and ensuring the health and productivity of your office-based workers.

Applications for Industry Accreditation

(SMAS, CHAS, Safe Contractor, Constructionline etc)

Safety Schemes in Procurement (SSIP) is the mutual recognition scheme for occupational health and safety standards within construction. Gaining just one accreditation with a recognized Contractor Accreditation Scheme means you can satisfy your legal responsibilities in assessing competence and you don’t have to waste time and money putting in applications for numerous different accreditations. In practice, however, even gaining that one accreditation can take a considerable amount of effort!

DCP Safety and Training has years of experience in SSIP applications for SMAS, CHAS, Constructionline and Safe Contractor, and can work with you to develop your systems, policies and procedures to ensure they meet legal requirements and therefore the criteria of the individual schemes.  It may be that your systems and procedures are already to acceptable standards and you just require assistance in completing the necessary application forms. Either way we can help.

 

Toolbox Talks

A toolbox talk is an informal safety meeting that should be part of your business’ overall safety program. They are usually brief meetings conducted on site prior to the commencement of a job or work shift and may cover topics such as workplace hazards or site-specific safe work practices.

Toolbox talks are generally considered a very effective method for refreshing workers' knowledge in between training sessions, covering last-minute safety checks, and ensuring a meaningful exchange of information and skills between workers.

At DCP Safety & Training we can prepare a suite of bespoke toolbox talks for your company - from the basic principles and understanding of Health & Safety elements, to the particular risks your employees may face. Contact us to find out more.

 

DSE/ Workstation Assessments

DSE stands for display screen equipment and covers any work equipment that has a screen that displays information such as a computer screen or tablet. The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations place a duty on employers to ensure that their employees are provided with appropriate equipment, information and training to ensure their health and welfare is not adversely affected by DSE use.

This is because, as we all know probably only too well, the use of computer workstations or other DSE can often lead to the aches and pains referred to as upper limb disorders (ULDs) or repetitive strain injuries (RSI), as well as pain or discomfort to the neck, shoulder, back or arm, general fatigue and eyestrain.

It’s terribly important then that your employees understand and adopts good practice when using DSE - like having their screens at the correct height and takes regular breaks during intensive work. In most cases these precautions alone can reduce or eliminate many of those niggling symptoms and discomfort, but its easier said than done to fall back into bad habits or ignore an ache or pain.

DCP Safety and Training can help – by conducting a DSE Risk Assessment at your workplace we can ensure that everyone is fully trained in how to set up their workstation, adjust equipment accordingly, and are aware of the good practices to adopt. Individual written reports give line managers the information they need to understand and act on any issues preventing future problems arising and ensuring the health and productivity of your office-based workers.

Toolbox Talks

A toolbox talk is an informal safety meeting that should be part of your business’ overall safety program. They are usually brief meetings conducted on site prior to the commencement of a job or work shift and may cover topics such as workplace hazards or site-specific safe work practices.

Toolbox talks are generally considered a very effective method for refreshing workers' knowledge in between training sessions, covering last-minute safety checks, and ensuring a meaningful exchange of information and skills between workers.

At DCP Safety & Training we can prepare a suite of bespoke toolbox talks for your company - from the basic principles and understanding of Health & Safety elements, to the particular risks your employees may face. Contact us to find out more.

DSE/ Workstation Assessments

DSE stands for display screen equipment and covers any work equipment that has a screen that displays information such as a computer screen or tablet. The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations place a duty on employers to ensure that their employees are provided with appropriate equipment, information and training to ensure their health and welfare is not adversely affected by DSE use.

This is because, as we all know probably only too well, the use of computer workstations or other DSE can often lead to the aches and pains referred to as upper limb disorders (ULDs) or repetitive strain injuries (RSI), as well as pain or discomfort to the neck, shoulder, back or arm, general fatigue and eyestrain.

It’s terribly important then that your employees understand and adopts good practice when using DSE - like having their screens at the correct height and takes regular breaks during intensive work. In most cases these precautions alone can reduce or eliminate many of those niggling symptoms and discomfort, but its easier said than done to fall back into bad habits or ignore an ache or pain.

DCP Safety and Training can help – by conducting a DSE Risk Assessment at your workplace we can ensure that everyone is fully trained in how to set up their workstation, adjust equipment accordingly, and are aware of the good practices to adopt. Individual written reports give line managers the information they need to understand and act on any issues preventing future problems arising and ensuring the health and productivity of your office-based workers.